Terry Pratchett is not one to go gentle into any night

Terry Pratchett: 28 April 1948 – 12 March 2015. He died at home, surrounded by his family.

rather than let Alzheimer’s take me, I would take it. I would live my life as ever to the full and die, before the disease mounted its last attack, in my own home, in a chair on the lawn, with a brandy in my hand to wash down whatever modern version of the ‘Brompton cocktail’ some helpful medic could supply. And with Thomas Tallis on my iPod, I would shake hands with Death.”

AT LAST, SIR TERRY, WE MUST WALK TOGETHER

Terry took Death’s arm and followed him through the doors and on to the black desert under the endless night.

The End.

Terry Pratchett was diagnosed with posterior cortical atrophy in 2007, a rare form of early onset Alzheimer’s.

His books live on.

Alzheimer Scotland: Action on Dementia and Alzheimer’s UK would appreciate your support.

Neil Gaiman, December 2012:

“Terry still has all of his faculties. He’s fighting Alzheimer’s, but he has a rare kind of Alzheimer’s which means physical objects no longer make sense to him, but he still has memory, and he still has a mind, and he’s still very much the sharpest knife in the drawer. But he couldn’t read the script, so I had to give him his lines.”He sighs – that pause again. “And it was this very strange, sad, sweet, funny, odd moment, as the two of us sat in the car with Dirk’s lines inspired by a line that one of us had written 26 years earlier. With me saying my line first and then Terry’s line. And then Terry echoing his lines. It was a little moment for me and Terry. I don’t know if we’re acting terribly well, but it’s a moment that made me extra happy.”

I HAVE TO KNOW. WHAT WOULD HAVE HAPPENED IF I HAD NOT… LOST?
– “At the cards, you mean?”
YES. WHAT WOULD YOU HAVE DONE?
– “Well, for a start … I’d have broken your bloody arm.”

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